Workshops & Content

It is a challenge finding accurate and useful information about that directly benefits you and your child. myHana members are given access to an ever expanding library of high quality curated content on a variety of topics.

In addition, the myHana faculty provides live and recorded trainings relative to your child’s unique condition.

You Must Be A Member To Access The Workshops.

Workshops 
& Trainings


 

Managing challenging behaviors, frustration, anxiety and teaching social skills.

Jed Baker
Director Social Skill Training Project

  • Dr. Baker Session 1
  • Understanding why challenging behavior occurs precedes effective intervention
  • Hope and certain attributional styles lead to better outcomes
  • The limits of discipline versus emotional regulation strategies
  • Dr Banner and the Incredible Hulk: two states of mind
  • Crisis Management of The Incredible Hulk
  • Asking the “why” question for repeat problems
  • Functional Behavioral Assessment with a focus on triggering events
  • 7 common triggers to frustration and anxiety
  • The parts of an effective behavioral intervention plan
  • Prevention plans for dealing with demanding work are described, focusing on modifying work and teaching the skill, “trying when it’s hard.”
  • The concept of a “growth mindset” (Carol Dweck) emphasizing effort and asking for help is reviewed in detail.
  • Objective: Learn how to prevent frustration related to new or challenging task demands.
  • The art and science of overcoming anxiety are outlined.
  • Includes: How to win individuals over to work on their anxiety, educate them as to how anxiety works, create fear ladders to gradually face fears, reward efforts to face each step of the ladder, combat worrisome thoughts with simple “think like a scientist” strategies, reduce anxiety with exercise and meditation, and consider the use of biological interventions such as neurofeedback and medication.
  • Objective: Learn how to overcome anxieties through creating motivation, designing fear ladders to gradual face fears, using simple CBT strategies, using exercise and meditation, and possibly biological interventions.
  • The focus here is on helping individuals learn to wait, handle disappointments, changes in routine, and accept no. The use of visual timers and schedules to help clarify when individuals can have desired items and activities is described along with skills to help individuals understand what there is to look forward to even in the face of disappointments.
  • Objective: Learn how to prevent challenges triggered by having to wait, accept no’s. handle a disappointment or unexpected change in routine, or stop a favored activity.
  • How to handle mistakes, correction, losing a game and being teased are all covered.
  • Second, how to get attention in positive ways is described including ways peers can support students’ efforts to get attention appropriately.
  • Objective: 1. Learn how to prevent challenges related to making a mistake, losing a game, or being teased. 2. Learn how to prevent challenges related to not getting desired attention from adults or peers.
  • This chapter describes how to handle sensory challenges by modifying the environment and advocating for sensory needs.
  • Sensory overload, need for stimulation and problems with self-stimulation are reviewed, including the issue of public masturbation. Ways to visual support rules around private time are reviewed.
  • Ways to handle unexpected triggers to upset are described emphasizing the use of relaxation folders and learning that “all problems can be solved if you can wait and talk to the right person.”
  • Objective: 1) Learn how to prevent challenges associated with sensory overload, need for more stimulation, and self-stimulation including the issue of masturbation. 2) Learn ways to prepare for unexpected challenges by using a relaxation folder.
  • Tiered model of social support in school versus individualized approach.
  • One size does not fit all: Prioritizing relevant skill goals.
  • Measuring social skill performance.
  • Knowing what to do does not mean one will do it: Establishing motivation to use skills.
  • Modifications to the environment to maximize success.
  • Skill acquisition: strategies to teach skills based on language ability.
  • Generalization strategies: prompting skills in real settings.
  • Having skills does not insure peer acceptance: Creating accepting peer environments.
  • The diagnosis of ASD and associated levels of severity are reviewed with a focus on language ability.
  • Various strategies to teach skills are reviewed based on the level of language functioning.
  • Level 3: focus on visually based strategies.
  • Level 2: combination of visuals and verbal description strategies.
  • Level 1: reliance more on abstract language concepts to teach higher-level skills.
  • Ways to create peer buddy programs for both verbal and less verbal children who may be socially isolated.
  • How to protect students from bullying using both generic peer sensitivity lessons and more individualized peer sensitivity lessons.

Coming Soon...

Topics for Webinars on Early Intervention (Birth to 5)

James Ball
President/Chief Executive Officer JB Consulting

  • Participants will be able to determine the ultimate motivator for toilet training.
  • Participants will be able to develop an effective data collection system to track a toilet training program.
  • Participants will be able to use appropriate prompting techniques for successful toilet training.
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 positive behavioral support techniques to assist in reducing behavior issues with an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to implement 3 specific behavioral techniques that will assist in reducing behavior issues with an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to design an individualized behavioral program that will assist an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 specific teaching strategies to assist an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to implement 3 specific behavioral techniques that will assist an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to design an individualized video modeling program that will assist an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to determine what type of picture schedule would be the most appropriate for individuals on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to identify 5 key aspects of structure in a classroom for individuals on the spectrum.
  • Participants will understand the difference between an independent schedule and a standard picture schedule and why you use one over the other for individuals on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to identify 10 specific strategies to assist an individual on the spectrum in the transition process.
  • Participants will be able to implement 10 specific strategies that will assist an individual on the spectrum in the transition process.
  • Participants will be able to design an individualized transition program that will assist an individual on the spectrum in the transition process.
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 prompting techniques to assist an individual on the spectrum in the learning process.
  • Participants will be able to implement 3 specific prompting techniques that will assist an individual on the spectrum in the learning process.
  • Participants will be able to design an individualized discrete trial teaching program that will assist an individual on the spectrum in the learning process.
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 specific techniques to assist an individual on the spectrum with their social skills.
  • Participants will be able to implement 3 specific techniques that will assist an individual on the spectrum with their social skills.
  • Participants will be able to design an individualized social skills program that will assist an individual on the spectrum with their social skills.
  • Participants will be able to identify appropriate motivational systems to assist the use of social skills for individuals on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 reinforcement techniques to assist an individual on the spectrum in the learning process.
  • Participants will be able to implement 3 specific reinforcement strategies that will assist an individual on the spectrum in the learning process.
  • Participants will be able to design an individualized reinforcement program that will assist an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to determine the appropriate type of visuals to use with an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to develop an individualized picture system for individuals on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to discuss why the use of visuals is so effective in teaching an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 websites that assist with the communication of an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 websites that explore the curriculum of an individual on the spectrum.
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 Agencies that advocate for an individual on the spectrum.

Coming Soon...

Speech & Language Pathology

Marybeth Ames

  • Answer frequently asked questions
  • Differentiate private, school, and clinic criteria
  • Credentialing: SLP, SLPA. BACB, BAaCB
  • Research or propaganda
  • Marketing
  • Alternative therapies
  • Categorize good research
  • Butterfly Effects, scotopic sensitivity, casein/gluten
  • Feingold, Auditory Intensive Training, Keto, supplements
  • Self-checking game
  • Expansion of basic concepts
  • Numbers, colors, shapes
  • Innate?
  • Can it be taught?
  • How important is it?
  • Similar to Lindamood Bell without violating copyright
  • Emerging sound-symbol development
  • Listening, memory, visual skills
  • Hands-on Materials
  • Enrichment
  • Articulation
  • Language
  • Interactive communication
  • Manners not prioritized
  • Choking
  • No swallow, no chewing
  • ASD Habits

Live Training

(Children Under 12)

Live Training

(Children Over 12)

Workshops

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